Alternative leavening for quick bread, other than baking powder?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by oregonyeti, Oct 11, 2013.

  1. oregonyeti

    oregonyeti

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    I want to make pancake-type breads and I'm looking for a way to leaven them other than with baking powder. I might go with yeast, but at the same time I want to know if there's something quicker, and I don't have to use baking powder or baking soda. I don't want to use a lot of sodium. I'm thinking a combination of a fruit juice and a mineral might be an answer?
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2013
  2. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    If you use yeast then it's not a quickbread, it's just regular bread.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2013
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    When you say "pancake type bread" I'm assuming you mean griddle cakes.  While baking powder is foolproof, some griddle cakes like sourdough pancakes are yeast risen.  Other option is to use stiffly beaten egg white folded into your batter to get the lift, like one does for Genoise cake.
     
  4. oregonyeti

    oregonyeti

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    Thanks, people, I will probably try the egg whites.
     
  5. oregonyeti

    oregonyeti

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    I experimented some, and I found calcium carbonate plus cream of tartar works in place of baking powder. For proportions, I experimented with the CaCO3 dissolved  in water and then added cream of tartar. For 1 part by volume of powdered pure CaCO3, gradually adding the powdered cream of tartar and then stirring caused fizzing up to 3 parts volume, and then no more with my precise method of hearing the fizzing or not, so when I use this in place of baking powder I'll use a 1:3 ratio. I'm not sure what the equivalent amount would be for professional baking, since I'm not a pro. As a replacement for baking powder I've used a little more of this mixture than I would baking powder, with results that worked for me. As I try it more, I might find that more or less than that works better.

    Calcium carbonate is natural limestone, which has been part of people's diet for at least centuries and probably millenia, sometimes in masa harina and also dissolved in naturally occuring water supplies. Think limestone caves and sinkholes, and the springs in those areas.

    Cream of tartar naturally forms into tiny crystals as part of the process of making wine and even forms in chilled grape juice.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2013
  6. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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  7. oregonyeti

    oregonyeti

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    Thanks, Pete. I was looking for something like that. I also wanted to avoid aluminum, and the Hain brand does that. I'll compare it to mine.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2013