Alomnd, Coconut flour

689
19
Joined Feb 4, 2005
I need to cut my carbs and increases my fiber intake and see almond & coconut flour offer this but each has its own effect in recipes. I guessin that neither is 1 to 1 substitute for regular flour in breads, cakes or cookies so are there any general rules in using these complete or partly combo with regular flour, self raising, wheat even corn meal. I make no knead bread and thinking about bagles but recipe saw using almond flour used shredded mozzarella cheese and ground flax seed which don't understand.
 
7
1
Joined Mar 5, 2021
I need to cut my carbs and increases my fiber intake and see almond & coconut flour offer this but each has its own effect in recipes. I guessin that neither is 1 to 1 substitute for regular flour in breads, cakes or cookies so are there any general rules in using these complete or partly combo with regular flour, self raising, wheat even corn meal. I make no knead bread and thinking about bagles but recipe saw using almond flour used shredded mozzarella cheese and ground flax seed which don't understand.
Hey dagger!
Great post!
asides the health benefit from both coconut and almond. Coconut flour is more challenging to work solely with. main reason being it absorbs liquid way more than standard flour, so when working with coconut flour long resting periods are needed like an auto-lyse for bread making. so when you add all the liquid in any recipe and it looks like soup, leave it to rest and over time itll absorb giving you the desired texture. but dont be tempted to add more coconut flour or itll end up being dry dense and not great.

If wanting to use almond flour instead of coconut flour in recipes. then a general rule is for every 1/4 cup of coconut flour replace with 1 cup of almond flour and if theres an egg in the recipe then decrease the total egg and liquid by 1 egg per 1/4 cup coconut flour.

neither will replace standard flour in recipes but you can go 60/40 with flour and nut flour or coconut flour.

i hope this makes sense.
 
1
0
Joined Apr 16, 2021
I've been gluten free and low carb for 7 years now, and use coconut flour, almond meal, almond flour, cassava flour, chick pea flour, tigernut, buckwheat and arrowroot, all in various combinations. (Even finely ground shredded coconut makes an amazing chocolate cake!) You can find lots of recipes in the autoimmune protocol community, and gluten free low carb community. Each flour has its quirks and sometimes, each brand is different to another. Coconut flour can be really dry, and almond flour, heavy. You may be reinventing the wheel when there are some good cooks, chefs and bakers out there who have been experimenting for years. Some of the good websites are Jane's Healthy Kitchen, ElanasPantry (for almond flour recipes), ThePaleoMom. There are more! It's really fun experimenting, but some of the flours are expensive as are the good sugar substitutes that aren't chemical bombs. You can't really apply standard wheat flour baking practices. (the ground flax seeds might be subbing eggs, for example, or added as a binding agent). Pie crusts are an easy intro - since there is such a tradition of almond flour in Italian pastries. Let me know if you have more questions :)
 
689
19
Joined Feb 4, 2005
I made nestles toll house cookies and cut it to 1 1/4 cup flour to 1 cup almond flour and it been exceptable results but increasing almond flour amount failed cookies went flat. I also add 4 tbs milk powder and 2 tbs coffee since it goes with chocolate starting to use flavored coffee again good results. So a recipe for low card bagles but its really strange and to buy them on line is over $8 for 6. I'll buy regula bagles 6 for $2.99 and just eat half
 
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29
12
Joined Feb 28, 2015
Yes by default. Low carb diets replace carbs with fat and the OP is on a low carb diet' so in that respect its a good thing. The body switches to ketones and you start burning fat for fuel instead of sugar/glycogen.
 

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