A Week of Groceries In Different Countries [Pictures]

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by jake t buds, Oct 11, 2013.

  1. jake t buds

    jake t buds

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  2. french fries

    french fries

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    The poorer the country, the healthier the food. 
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2013
  3. siduri

    siduri

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    I was always shocked, going back to the states, to find that 70% of people's refrigerator space was dedicated to soft drinks, usually with saccharine and other crap in them, and that they gave this stuff to kids. 
     
  4. french fries

    french fries

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    You don't know how many time I've heard "But it's diet coke, so it's healthy!". /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif
     
  5. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Private Chef
     
  6. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

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    Mexico = lots of fruit but i was surpised by 10 liters of coke

    Autralia = Lots of meat

    USA = they bought even freaking boxed pizza XD they had packages food up to the ceiling. 

    But i wont lie the most appealing groceries to me were the Japanese and the Guatamela...

    As said the poorer the countries the more natural the food seems to be. 
     
  7. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Yes yes yes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  The best natural food I ever ate was from either Senegal or Algeria!  Or even France.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2013
  8. siduri

    siduri

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    that opens a whole other topic, "healthy" food.  When people say "i want some recipes for healthy xxx" or " i want to make my yyys healthier" - you never know what they mean.  Often they mean no sugar but plenty of chemicals, or no real food, but plenty of highly processed "light" products ("light" cheddar).  And then there is also the question of who is it healthier for.  If i have diabetes, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, peanut allergies, overweight or underweight, or am deficient in some substance, or whatever, will make a difference what is healthier for me   . 

    I wonder how many people realize how highly oversweetened "diet" drinks are.   They don't just hurt you by filling you with bad stuff, but they raise your sweetness tolerance level (besides educating a palate not to distinguish sweet from chemical taste - the taste is horrible, the aftertaste is worse!). 
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2013
  9. jake t buds

    jake t buds

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     The Huge Chill. Why Are American Refrigerators So Big?
     
  10. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Our fridges are so huge to accomodate high volumes of food - since in most american areas don't have local, neighborhood by neighborhood, independent vendors of meats and produce.  It's all been corporatized into supermarkets.  Big boxes rule in this country.  F*** corporated amerika and its big boxes.  Sorry for the foul language.  ....No....I'm not sorry.
     
  11. siduri

    siduri

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    Well, most people in north america live far from stores.  I could get everything i need here in Rome without ever stepping on a bus, never mind a car, and in the early times i was here, i shopped every day at local stores and street markets, as there are in every neighborhood.  I wasn't working outside the home then, or only a couple of hours a week. 

    Italy is primarily urban, even in small centers, while americans always spread out widely, and there are NO local stores.  So i can understand the large fridges - what is so strange is that they seem to contain mostly junk.  Mine are packed with vegetables (i have two smaller fridges, since i shop once a week here, but much of it is vegetables).  The rest of my shopping is paper products, detergents, milk, and then meat (we eat it maybe 4 or 5 times a week) and pasta, rice, flour, eggs, oil, and other staples.
     
  12. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    @siduri:  same here, packed with veggies, condiments, herbs and spices, Budweiser, vino, dairy(liquids) and cheeses. Here in amerika the very few sodas that I purchase are made in Mexico, made with cane sugar instead of the high fructose stuff.  You'll never see more that three or four twelve-ounce bottles of soda in my fridge at a time.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2013
  13. sonecac

    sonecac

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    I always thought Turkish people ate dolmas, almonds,  tahini sauces and chickpeas all day. I never thought they ate so much bread.
     
  14. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I Just Like Food
    I do not live far from stores.  I'm used to just getting fresh stuff for the next day or two, but have canned beans, tomato sauce and such stashed away for when needed.

    I recently posted this on Facebook:

    A lovely early autumn day here in the Salt Lake valley. Just walked up to the store to get some chicken parts to grill for dinner. That's one aspect I really like about living here in this house. There are 2 major chain groceries within walking distance. Two Asian specialty markets, one of which has roast duck and char sui ready to go on weekends. I took a picture of the whole ducks hanging in the warmer, need to take another suitable for posting.

    There is also LIberty Park, Salt Lake's biggest, just a couple blocks down the street ( I do live on Park Street ) the Wasatch Community Garden's Grateful tomato garden is right around the corner. There are also 2 nice coffee shops, an Ace Hardware, Trader Joe's, Desert Edge Pub Brewery and some decent restaurants all within strolling radius.

    What I don't like is that this increased level of physical activity was intended to reduce the lower back and hip pain I get when walking, not make it worse. Sigh.

    mjb.
     
  15. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    What we call pizza is actually a variation on Turkish (and other middle eastern countries) flatbread onto which is placed veggies.  It ain't some Italian invention.
     
  16. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    The Southeast Asia Market is probably my favorite asian store in the valley. Ocean Mart on 90th has more variety if I need something less mainstream but the drive adds some cost.  The Japanese one by you is expensive.
     
  17. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Periodically I make a trip to the bigger city about an hour's drive away.  There, after having lunch at the [Asian] Indian restaurant for some tandoori chicken and other stuff, I drop by the Pakistani and Korean markets for foodstuffs.  What a visual and olefactory feast!!!!!!!    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif  
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2013
  18. siduri

    siduri

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    You can bet that every country's cuisine is mainly based on some grain staple in the form of bread, porridge, boiled grain, soup, whatever or other starchy ingredient lke potatoes.  The idea of a meal without bread (or rice, or polenta, or potatoes etc) is inconceivable in most countries, most cultures.  The idea of a meal of just a salad, or just meat and vegetables, without bread (or rice or...) is weird.  The idea of a meal based on almost exclusively the staple grain or root is not weird.  My parents used to tell the story of the poor people who would have a salt cod hanging over the kitchen table where they ate their polenta, and to get some taste on it would slap a slab of polenta onto the cod and then eat it.   Laborers in Italy, construction workers, marble cutters, etc,  would bring their lunch, a gigantic half pagnotta (big bread loaf) and onions. 
    Well, to think of pizza as an invention of any one country doesn't make sense.  What does it take to mix flour and water that's been left out and fermented and bake it on a hot stone?  It's like saying soup was invented in some place or other, or pasta, or roasted meat.  It probably arose all over the world and probably long before the iron age.  Not an italian invention, not a turkish invention, but probably the stone age ancestors of all of us invented it. 
    we're really lucky in Rome to have had a flood of immigration from all of the poorer countries in the last 20 years, and the international area is in walking distance of my house.  The large  traditional outdoor market that used to be mainly Italian (it was the poorest neighborhood in central rome) has gradually been taken over by immigrants, and you can see a delight of rich spice colors in open containers - Indians next to Pakistanis, North African Halal meat next to Polish pork butchers! 

    Make food, not war.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif  
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2013
  19. genemachine

    genemachine

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    As my profile says, I am from Bavaria. Right now, I am living in a small town, just a couple of thousand inhabitants. On a rough count, I have 5 butchers, 3 greengrocers, 2 cheese shops, a fishmonger, and I don't want to start counting the bakeries withing 15 minutes cycling or light rail distance. That and a weekly farmer's market. Fresh and local stuff.

    This absolutely stunned me when I moved to the US a couple of years ago for a 6 month research project. Butchers? Bakeries? Ehm... not really. Just a couple of supermarkets with a rather marginal produce section. Meat packed in styrofoam and foil?? I did experience a bit of a culture shock back then. 

    Supermarkets are encroaching on the small businesses here, too, I fear. But so far, they hold out, in particular by providing superior quality.
     
  20. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    That's what's great about living in NYC, you never technically have to go further than walking distance to buy groceries.  As a matter of fact it's kind of a rule in our house not to stock our fridge.  Instead I walk to the market every single day to buy that day's food.  It's a little more costly to live like this, because most of the food is fresh but it's worth it.  Within 2 blocks of me I have supermarkets, fish monger, butcher, organic shops, coffee specialty stores, mediterranean specialty stores, juice bar, pharmacy, bank, restaurants, etc.  I technically never have to leave but every month I do go to Costco to stock up on paper goods and on Saturdays I drive to a nearby farmer's market.