A question on asymmetry

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by geo87, Aug 29, 2013.

  1. geo87

    geo87

    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    Hi all,

    I've been doing a lot of reading about asymetric knives and there's one thing that's got me stumped and I can't find any info on this.

    Why can't you steel an asymetric knife?

    Im assuming people say this because they create asymmetry by sharpening more on one side. Steeling an edge like this would undo the asymmetry ?

    However , my asymetric knives have different angles on each side but are sharpened evenly. They are also HRC 60 .

    Why can't I steel these with a fine ceramic if I match the asymetric angles with the steel?

    Or am I wrong for sharpening the differnt angles evenly and should i be sharpening less on one side? Thus making steeling a bad idea?

    Some light shed on this would be appreciated, it's taking a while to wrap my head around it all :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2013
  2. harlock0083

    harlock0083

    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    23
    Exp:
    At home cook
    I think Jon from JKI addressed the issue in a youtube video. I'll try to find the post and add the link. 
     
  3. jbroida

    jbroida

    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    21
    Exp:
    Former Chef
  4. geo87

    geo87

    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    Jon,

    I believe I have watched all your videos on sharpening.
    Thank you so much for these they were very thorough and informative.
    However I don't recall a video on asymmetry.
    The link you posted is slightly relevant although if the answer to my question was in there it went straight over my head.

    Harlock,
    Are you referring to the video on sharpening steels and honing rods?
    I seem to remember the main point of that video was that steeling knives of high hardness is a bad idea as it results in chipping. My knives are HRC 60 and unless I'm ill informed this is not that hard and an acceptable hardness for steeling ( with light pressure)

    My main question is why can't you steel an asymetric blade under HRC 62 ? Assuming that the angles are different, but sharpened with relatively even amount of strokes on each side . ( this is what I do, am I doing something wrong here)

    As a side note the blades are both ground 70/30 right hand bias.
    210mm Tadasuna wa gyuto
    270mn Missono Sweden sujihiki
     
  5. harlock0083

    harlock0083

    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    23
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Hi Geo, yeah I think that was the video you were refering to. As home cook I don't have a need for a steel and prefer to maintain my knives by stropping. Sorry can't help you here :(
     
  6. geo87

    geo87

    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    Benuser,

    Did you mean to say, I'd just give it a try?

    Thank you for your explanation this is making sense.... I think.

    So to summarise asymmetric japanese blades are typically very thin thus making them susceptible to damage when steeling regardless of steel hardness. the forces involved in steeling put a lot of pressure on the very edge as apposed to stropping where the forces are dispersed over a greater surface area.

    Am I on the right track?
    I'm just trying to truly understand the subject rather than just blindly doing it cos that's what everyone says to do :)
     
  7. geo87

    geo87

    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    Thanks for your help this all makes sence.
    I have two sabatier nongents as well as the j knives so I'm looking foward to putting all the theory into practice. Also a HA stropping kit arriving shortly :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2013
  8. harlock0083

    harlock0083

    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    23
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Sweet! May I ask whats in the kit?
     
  9. geo87

    geo87

    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    Balsa strop, leather strop , felt deburring block , 1u boron carbide.
    As far as I'm aware the boron is good for refining edges whilst retaining the toothyness needed for most tasks. And the bare leather strop for daily mantainance/ touch ups. The edges ill be using it on range from 1k , 3k & 5k .
     
  10. harlock0083

    harlock0083

    Messages:
    127
    Likes Received:
    23
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Nice, I cut up a bunch of balsa wood and made strops out of them (I use HA diamond sprays 0.25 to 1 micron on them). Its excessive but the stropped edges are fun while they last!