A cooking term

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by gareth, Feb 3, 2011.

  1. gareth

    gareth

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    Hi all, 

    Thick layers of dry spice marinade on meat that are deliberately allowed to burn in an oven or BBQ.  There is a term to to describe  this style of cooking but I can't remember it, can some one help please?  Regards  Gareth
     
  2. french fries

    french fries

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    n/a - sorry
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2011
  3. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Hi Gareth,

    I think maybe its called a "blackening" rub.  Others will correct me if I'm wrong :)

    DC
     
  4. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    First, if it is "dry spices" it is probably a rub.

    Second, I am not aware of anyone who will admit to "deliberately allowed to burn in an oven or BBQ".

    If you are referring to B-B-Q, you might be referring to the "bark" or maybe that's on smoked meat, never did get that straight /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rollsmile.gif

    Maybe you can describe it a little further???
     
  5. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    My first reaction was to say "ruined." Like Pete I can't imagine anyone intentionally burning a hunk of meat.

    FWIW, Pete, you were right the second time. "Bark" is a term usually used with smoked meats.
     
  6. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Well, whadda ya expect from a Tri-tip griller /img/vbsmilies/smilies/laser.gifbrains too? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif I figured it was one or the other so I covered "both bases".
     
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2011
  7. gareth

    gareth

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    Hi Peter,

    The meat doesn't burn. The outer spice layer burns as the fat renders through it. Its important to keep turning the meat every 10 min to start and as the fat runs more often. The spice layer acts as a sacrificial layer it. The layer is nearly all edible providing you keep the heat below 180 but some flare ups are inevitable and so parts of it (the spice layer) will be a bit charcoal. Some one posted blackening. It is a similar style though with blackening the meat or fish ends up sitting ints own juices, where as this does not. Thanks for the feed back though.
     
  8. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    There's a procedure called "persillade", often used on lambleg cooked in the oven. However, letting it burn is not allowed! When the meat is in the last 15 minutes of cooking, you have to remove it from the oven, cover with a layer of mustard and then turn it in a parcely/(garlic)/breadcrumb mixture. Then it's put back in the oven. You could try it on a barbecue, as long as you don't burn it
     
  9. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    so I covered "both bases".

    So, this guy asks me if I'm a man of decision.

    "Well, yes and no," I replied.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
     
  10. gareth

    gareth

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    Chris,

    Sounds great, I'll give that one a try at home, but do I have to share the leg with any one! The spice rub we have also found works better if you mix the last layer of spice rub with flour.

    Regards
     
  11. gareth

    gareth

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    DC, Just received some info and it looks like you are right. Blackening is the cooking style. The heat source is the same,  its method of holding the food that's different.
     
  12. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Gareth - I like to be proven right, especially when I'm wrong /img/vbsmilies/smilies/peace.gifAnd that applies to all areas of life...../img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif

    But seriously, I do believe this method can be used on a variety of proteins, including fish.  Just have to keep a close eye on the temp. and pay the cooking close attention.  The smell of burning is unmistakeable.  If it gets to this stage, well, you could try using it, but by that stage it's pretty much past it, unless you like it that way,
     
  13. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Yes  It is called SCARY
     
  14. carmen

    carmen

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    Within a reasonable price range, Weber is still the best - I did a ton of research on it before purchasing our $700.00 Weber recently. If your pocket book is limitless, I would look into Viking's outdoor grills - they are amazing!

    -----------------------------------------------

    barbecues
     
  15. pcieluck

    pcieluck

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    Sometimes at work I joke around and say "That's not burned, it's Brûléed !"