A Bowed Hiromoto

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by The Smith, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. The Smith

    The Smith

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    [​IMG]

    I've had this Hiromoto for a bit over two years. It's proved difficult to sharpen, and when I sighted it today, I found this:
    [​IMG]

    I'm new to nicer knives like the Hiromoto, and never thought to sight it for straightness when it first arrived. I'm a guitarist, and I always sight a guitar's neck before purchasing...I guess the same principle holds true. I don't know if the knife arrived like this, or if it happened afterwards; The knife has never been abused here, to my knowledge. I know that the man who made Hiromoto knives recently retired.

    My question is, what are my options at this point?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I get some of that when I crush garlic or the salt and knife drag technique for garlic paste. I make it a point now to use the "off" side of the blade as well to keep the forces and use balanced. Seems to help in my case at least.
     
  3. The Smith

    The Smith

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    ^ I'm not sure I understand. Are you saying that the bow is negligible and nothing to worry about?
     
  4. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Negligible is relative. Do you crush garlic or ginger with the flat of the blade? If you do, you can influence the blade to a more neutral position depending which side of the blade you use for these tasks and techniques.
    Martin Yan and Jeff Smith whacked these things with the flats and that can give some bend/bias in relation to the handle. I learned to cook from those two.
     
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  5. The Smith

    The Smith

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    No, I don't use the knife like that. Also, doesn't a knife that's bowed to the degree mine is become difficult to sharpen on a water stone?
     
  6. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Try to clamp it between two pieces of pine. It doesnt look so bad. Worse is if it torqued instead of bent like this.

    I sharpen in sections so it wouldnt bother me for that. It looks useable as is but try the clamp overnight
     
  7. The Smith

    The Smith

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    ^OK, thanks!
     
  8. jbroida

    jbroida

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    Yeah... its not horrible, but you want to fix it before doing any sharpening. There are a number of ways to fix it, but the gist of it is bending it back into place. Make sure to not bend so far as to break it, and also try to avoid introducing new bends. It takes some practice to do well.
     
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  9. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Clamping for long periods is one method, if you're adventurous you might try this:

    That's a thin blade, even better is that it's san mai consteuction, and you should be able to bend by holding between both hands and using thumbs and fingers to put a nice long bow (no sharp bending) in opposite direction. You'll quickly see just ho to distribute the loud to get a nice gradual bow, and by looks of it you show peek the bow right about middle of blade. Make several attempts, getting a bit more bend each time, until you see some effect.

    Take all precautions too prevent cutting yourself of course, I'd also insist you wear safety glasses while doing this incase the blade should snap. Ideally you woulld overbend it just slightly, then give it a litlle flex in opposite direction to bring it to straight. This balances out the stresses.
     
  10. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    I recommend to try the clamping first because there is no way you'll make it worse. Leave the more drastic measures for after.
     
  11. mike9

    mike9

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    Being that the blade is two thirds soft stainless you might get lucky.

    I have an old carbon chef bent like that and it was a bear to straighten. I got most of it out, but man mono steel construction is hard. I would have chucked it, but it has a beautiful profile so I feel it's worth the effort to save..
     
  12. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Yeh a did a monosteel, it just took a number of flexing cycles. I eventually put a slight overbend in it, tweeked it to straight and it's been that way ever since. The sanmai should be lots easier, especially when so thin.