A Baker's Scale

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by kokopuffs, Jul 26, 2001.

  1. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I need recommendations for a baker's scale, for breadmaking. It would be used only domestically. I already own an Ohaus Triple Beam Scale but think that it's too delicate for kitchen work.
     
  2. lobster

    lobster

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    Hello -
    What maximum weight do you think you'll need to cover? There are commercial grade digital scales that can handle up to 10 lbs. The one I own can measure in either lbs/ounces or kilos/grams, and tares easily. It's all metal construction, easy to clean, and runs on house current or a nine volt battery. Regrettably, I'm blanking out on the brand name, and it wasn't cheap {$250-$300}, but it's been indestructable for me. I'll rustle up the brand name.
     
  3. lobster

    lobster

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    Hi again -
    The electronic digital scale I own is made by the Edlund company. It's all stainless steel construction, and the current catalog price I found here in Oregon is $307.00 for the one that weighs up to 10 lbs. They make one that handles less weight {5lbs?} for less $$.
     
  4. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I plan to make less that 5 pounds of dough. Probably in the range of 1.5 - 3.0 pounds max. My goal is to increase the basic, 3-5 cup recipe a little. Using a scale along with baker's percentages seems the easiest way to go.
     
  5. djr5

    djr5

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  6. isa

    isa

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    Koko I am also looking into scale. Sure would be a nice bday present. I really like the Cuisinart electronic scale. Not sure it qualify as a baker's scale though.

    Displays weight in either pounds or kilograms up to 11 pounds (5 kilograms) in increments of 1/4 ounces (5 grams). The function buttons are large, easy to use and easy to clean.

    [ July 26, 2001: Message edited by: Iza ]
     
  7. spoons

    spoons

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  8. w.debord

    w.debord

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    I just bought a Edlunds scale yesterday, it looks the the ones posted my Spoons.

    I'm so excited I can't stand it!!!!! I can't believe how quickly I could work thru a recipe not having to convert everything to ounces, yeah hooo!

    I've never had a good scale! It works both in ounces and grams, but the idea of measuring in fluid amounts sounds interesting too (no more converting). I believe that it goes to 5 lb.s but now I'm not sure maybe it was 10 lbs.? It was $150.00 through our Edward Don rep..

    But as I think about it it's not really the right scale for bread because I think in time cleaning it might become a problem where the feet sit into the base and control the balance. For bread making it's fine but for scaling up your dough, I'd go with an old fashioned cheaper model....my two cents.
     
  9. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Right now the SALTER MICROTRONIC looks attractive. It is sensitive to plus/minus 2 grams. Most of the other scales are sensitive to plus/minus 7 grams or 1/4 oz. IMHO 1/4 oz sensitivity doesn't seem accurate enough.

    The only drawback to the MICROTRONIC is its max weight, 5 pounds. But, I won't be making dough that will exceed that weight. :)
     
  10. isa

    isa

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    That's a good point Koko. I want to be able to weight my .3 ounce of fresh yeast.