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Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by pollopicu, Apr 24, 2013.

  1. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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  2. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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  3. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Is that you in the video?

    1)  Let the ganache cool.

    2)  You whisking technique should be in a figure 8.

    3)  Stir in half the meringue, fold in the next half.

    Now you have a Marquise.  Know how this is supposed to feel.

    4)  Now the cream  Half first, then half again.
     
  4. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    The butterfat and cocoa butter need to firm up. 
     
  6. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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  7. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    You just melted cocoa butter in the double boiler and softend up the butterfat in the cream when you whipped it.
     
  8. rosesen

    rosesen

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    Cocoa butter crystals continue to crystallize upwards of 48 hours after first setting. I agree with kuan, the protein in the yolk and butterfat in the whip creatake time to fully set. E.g. Creme brulee must set up overnight, or an ice cream base should be chilled overnight.

    The desired consistency of the mousse can be somewhat adjusted depending on it's intended use. Soupy mousse is too thin, grainy/gritty mousse is too thick.

    Factors I see in your recipe that affect consistencyt:

    The thickness of your chocolate/egg yolk base (how much you cook it)

    Whipping the cream more or less

    The temperature of the chocolate/egg base before you add the whipped cream (too warm can cause a soupy mousse)

    The quality/type of your chocolate; dark chocolate couverture sets up better

    Adding gelatin will speed up the setting process and make the product more stiff

    Using a digital thermometer may help you in your trials.

    There is also a point of overmixing, where you lose the structure from the whip cream(the buttermilk seperated from the butterfat), and it becomes soupy.

    Depending on the size of cups, piping is usually much easier than spooning.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2013
  9. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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