6 T Cookie Dough

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by natalierae, Jul 22, 2014.

  1. natalierae

    natalierae

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    I usually make chocolate chip cookies with a 3 T scoop.  My husband wanted really big cookies, so I doubled that.  The cookies came out with a completely different texture.  The outside was crispier than we like and the inside seemed cakier.  Any tips?  I baked them at 375 for 18 min.
     
  2. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Your title says you are a professional baker so I am curious why you are asking a question you should know the answer to? Are you mis-titled?
     
  3. chefboyog

    chefboyog

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    Professional bKer means you get paid to bake. Good baker on the other hand is a different title entirely.
     
  4. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Although I am not a pastry person my first thought is that the more mass of dough you have requires you to cook it at a slighter cooler temp and for longer. If your measurements are accurate then the type of measure you use should not make a difference.
     
  5. natalierae

    natalierae

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    I operate a small home-based road side stand and do get paid to bake, but I did not attend culinary school.  So, I'm not at professional baker status.  I'm not skilled in everything and do have some questions when trying new things.  This is a helpful site.
     
  6. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    It's the same concept as taking a drop cookie recipe and trying to make bars with it, they're just not compatible for that purpose. 

    In your case, your cookie normally melts and spreads and solidifies within the parameters of the recipe and baking instructions. Doubling the size means the cookie tries to spread, but sets at the edges before the full spread has happened. This keeps the center thicker and it bakes up cakier.

    You can help things out a bit by mashing the cookie flatter before baking--essentially pre-spreading the cookie partially, but also thinning it out to help it bake more evenly. You might even find it better to dish the center more than the rest of the cookie.  As noted, a temperature reduction is also reasonable. You're going to have to do some experimentation. TAKE NOTES of all the changes you make so you can track your changes and results. Don't try too many changes at once as it can be difficult to attribute which changes had which results. 

    Similarly, what fat you uses affects the spread and texture of a cookie and some changes might help you out. Margarine, with the most water content has the most spread when used in a cookie. Butter has less water and spreads less. Shortening has the least water and the spreads the least. 

    Good luck and tell us what worked out best for you. 
     
  7. chefboyog

    chefboyog

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    Your pro baker then in my books.
    I didn't mean to be rude re reading my post I was a bit quick.


    No one knows everything.

    Patch you gave wonderful tips, nice.
     
  8. chefross

    chefross

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    I have yet another suggestion.

    I worked in a Canadian based bakery franchise years ago (Tiffany's Bakeries) and our chocolate chip cookies were a main seller.

    The dough was rolled into 4" logs about 18" long then sliced every 2".

    The resulting dough would be pressed down with the palm of the hand.

    15 would fit on a full size sheet pan.

    They bake 15-20 minutes at 500 degrees....

    (we used bakery deck ovens that rotated. I could fit 3 pans on one deck and there was 5 decks in the oven.)

    Cookies came out crisp on the edges and chewy insides. They were about 5" in diameter.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2014
  9. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    But what's the question?
     
  10. cocoanut

    cocoanut

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    All the tips here sound great, but I would just add that if you do flatten them before baking, you can also experiment with freezing them before putting them in the oven. It tends to preserve the shape of the cookie a bit better, and if they are pre-formed and staying in the oven longer it might keep them from turning into a runny mess. Hope I helped!