3 doubts about deserts (chemical reactions)

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by peixeescorpiao, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. peixeescorpiao

    peixeescorpiao

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    Ok, hi everybody!

    I have here 3 doubts about my deserts. Two of them are about my recipe of Tiramisú, the other about french merengue. My book doesn`t explain enough.

    1 -  why should I cook sugar and water until 121C and add it into egg yolks while it`s beating slowly ? What`s the chemical process inside this action and it`s purpose?

    2 - why the cream  should be cold if my intention is to do chantilly?

    3 - why we need to emulsify sugar and egg whites in the water bath till 50C when doing french merengue?
     
  2. munak991

    munak991

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    1 -  why should I cook sugar and water until 121C and add it into egg yolks while it`s beating slowly ? What`s the chemical process inside this action and it`s purpose?

    Well basically, heating sugar to 118C to be exact (soft ball). When sugar reach certain temperature it change its properties, hence getting chewy/ firm/glossy meringue at the end result. There is alot of terminology for each state (temperature reach) soft ball, firm ball, hard ball, hard crack. Different stages has different result and usage. And why not purely egg white? because adding hot sugar into egg it kill off bacteria by temeprature.

    Refer over here for your reference http://www.joyofbaking.com/StagesOfCookedSugar.html

    2 - why the cream  should be cold if my intention is to do chantilly?

    Chantily and Meringue is total different thing, Chantily is whipped cream with icing sugar. It is store in chilled temperature because cream is fats, and fats is volatile/sensitive to temperatue. so it must be kept chilled/pipe chilled

    3 - why we need to emulsify sugar and egg whites in the water bath till 50C when doing french merengue?

    French meringue? water bath? i think you are referring to swiss meringue, it is to sterilize/ kill off bacterial by hitting  certain degree C, and cooking  egg white/egg yolk it is much more stable compare to french meringue which use raw egg
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2014
  3. peixeescorpiao

    peixeescorpiao

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    Oh yes! It`s swiss not french! Sorry about that.

    I always see that beating yolk with sugar (not just hot) changes it`s color, do you think this is due to air and speed?

    Thank you ;)
     
  4. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

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    Well my theory is that since you are beating egg yolks your mixing air into them.

    Thus the space in between molecules grows as more air enters and mixes with the yolks. Scientifically speaking the yolks arent changing color...they are technically expanding. 

    Now when dealing with a cooking process the result and explanation differ. 
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2014
  5. peixeescorpiao

    peixeescorpiao

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    Ok, but people have told me (and I tasted it), that when you just mix sugar and yolk untill it (even when it`s not hot sugar) it has no taste of yolk, but if you don`t beat it enough, it brings to your mounth a horrible memory of egg. I always wanted to know why it happens. 
     
  6. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

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    <_< maybe because beating in the sugar is a form of mixing the sugar and yolk together duh...

    If you dont mix it enough the sugar will just sit at the bottom...therefore will not mix with egg.

    This is pretty elementary stuff... are you sure your a sous chef /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif
     
  7. peixeescorpiao

    peixeescorpiao

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    no :)