20 Trends for 2002

1,389
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Joined Jul 24, 2001
I hate to admit it but it's true. I wish it was the contrary.

That our vote would be enough to change things...

At least I agree and I keep saying that everysingle of us has responsibility to what is done! We are not to accuse some vague others.
I am responsible too for what is going on.
 
1,586
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Joined Jan 5, 2001
Let's be grateful that there is enough variety out there that we can decide which of Atheneaeus' hands to be in! ;)

I'm with you on your frustrations regarding fast-food and green (purple?) foods. However, I also have to say that I found this list to be pretty accurate. This is based on my own observations of course.

I don't see a problem with such lists as such. They cater to the foodie or the wannbe foodie who wants to be on the cutting edge of what's hot and what's not, even if they don't necessarily agree with everything. As a junior culinary professional, I read these lists with interest because I want to see how the general public views the trends that my community starts, what 'sticks', what doesn't, and what do I need to stay away from in order to be unique. It offers me a challenge.

Keep in mind that trends are just that: trends. Not necessarily improvements. I don't think the autor was passing jugement on any of them, just pointing them out.

Just my 2 Canadian cents!


PS: No ketchup, red, blue or otherwise on this gal's mac n' cheese!!!!
 

pete

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I am a culinary school gradutate and I have never fallen into the corporate mindset. Neither has many of my collegues. I have always created the food I want to do regardless of what the "trendsetters" say is going to happen. Sometimes my cooking will follow a trend and sometimes not. As for these lists, I find them sometimes amusing, sometimes insightful, sometimes informative, and sometimes downright stupid. Much of it depends on who or what organization put that list together. Either way I take offense at the inference that culinary school=coporate flunky. I have never been a "yes man" for any corporation and never plan to become one. And I believe that many chefs feel the same way, whether culinary school grads or not.
 
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Joined Oct 27, 2001
One thing on the list that sounded great (although I don't know if its a good idea to let you Americans in on the secret - when ever you learn the prices go up!) is Spanish libations.
Not just Rioja, but Ribero del Duero, and if you can get (although I've heard that in the US prices are really high) Priorat. Pure smooth velvet - many of these wines are as good as the thing that James Bond makes oblique references too to avoid being censored.
I'm wondering which one would go well with my horoscope sign?? Or would I be lucky and have them all??

thge only thing that I'm not so sure about is the white wines from Galicia. Albarin~o, is a grape that makes wonderful wine, but it doesn't travel well. If you can get some eat it ONLY with lightly cooked shellfish or fish - that's all Galicians eat with it
 
750
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Joined Apr 30, 2001
....shuffles in.....but Kraft Macaroni and Cheese with orange powder is really good once in a while you know,....it's comfort food. It's also something I ate made with just water for 25 cents per box when in college.....

I agree on the trends thing. Many trends come and go - some stick with us and I'm glad. We have had trends which introduced new and exciting veggies or better ways of preparing foods. I think of the stir-fry trend of the late 70s which my poor mother really screwed up for a while, but now she makes really great, healthy, stir frys.

We've got the coffee trend thing still going on and who could hate that Starbucks and Jitterbean and dozens of other little coffee houses springing up right and left with half caf double shot lattes I mean a little caffiene just getsyourdayoffontherighttrack! Coffee! Coffeecoffeecoffee! JAVA!

I think the weird colored food trend will eventually go away. Or at least I hope.
 
1,389
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Joined Jul 24, 2001
I think that our opinions are personal and they do represent the universal and katholic truth, so why to be offended.I am glad we have different opinions. :)

Anyway.

IMHO trends exist in the minds of people that write those lists and in the lives of the very few that follow them.
Some day, a wise friend told me that some people behave as if they are playing to the movies and not as if they are living their lives...
These are the trendy people. They perform a life they don't live one.
In my village we eat saltfish for 200 years now but in Athens' hot spots they eat it this year only.
My village is very trendy I guess...

Of course none died of the existence of those lists ...

You have to admit though that promoting a trend needs money and support from a whole series of persons or institutions that form a chain. And chains usually, are not for the good

:)
 

pete

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Athenaeus, it is not personal opinions that I have an issue with, it is the use of a gross generalization that can be construed to be belittling, that I have a problem with. Voicing opinions is what makes these forums, fun and interesting. Sterotyping and making gross generalizations are not voicing opinions, its perpetuating ideas that have little basis in fact.
 
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Joined Aug 11, 2000
Well, I leave for a couple of weeks to talk around the state of Mo on community involvements with the local farming community and come back to trends that are anything but. Ok, Food Economics 101.....Our state ag budget is $33m 78% of our farmers are small farmers they access little of that money. Universities recieve monies for reseach from large corps (MONSANTO>>>>)
they are also recieving public monies from the tobacco settlement to the tune of $21Million.....how much land is used on organic research? or public fundage to small farm and sustainable pratices?
Dr. Bill Heffernen wrote about 5 corps running our food system....we are paying for farmers that raise commodities (corn, wheat and soy) to recieve ($73.5BBBBILLION proposed in the farm bill) to offset the low rates our farmers get from the corps. So essentially you are paying large corporations to stay in biz with your tax dollars.
Large grocery stores sell organic shipped in from large farms on the coasts....it is cheaper for them to buy and ship across the country than to buy locally....what is wrong with this picture?
I'm not giving up, this is not my vision of the world. I want to live in a community with farmers raising wonderful products, I wanna teach kids an ecologically viable way to raise food, I want to not have chemical companies out for the bottom line monopolizing our seeds, I want to have birds, bugs, bees, bats seen as important to our environment rather than labeled pests......So I'm off to talk tomorrow and am writing two papers involving working with sustainable farmers, going to a new board meeting on confinement animal iradication and lobbying for fundage for Mo organic certification monies. If you spend $10 every week buying local you will support your community....in the winter it may be bread, honey, jam, meats, tofu.....Don't give up! I won't.
 
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Joined Oct 27, 2001
Thank you Shroom, I think that we taxpayers living in 'democratic' company should pay a lot closer attention to how our money is spent. Especially when it comes to food, pharmaceuticals and weapons (or 'defence' as we are supposed to call it - although what a nuclear submarine site in the middle of a Scottish loch is supposed to be 'defending' i don't know - Nessie??). The appropriation of OUR money to big businesses is incrediable.
 
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Joined May 11, 2001
Athenaeus: Good macaroni and cheese isn't all that different from Pastitsio if you don't include the ground lamb or beef.

Welcome back Shroom.
 
386
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Joined May 11, 2001
Athenaeus: I said GOOD macaroni and cheese. It wasn't an insult on pastitsio which I happen to like very much. In the way I learned to make pastitsio, you start with a nice bechamel sauce and you either add the cheese to the sauce or layer the cheese. I usually added the cheese to the sauce because it somehow tasted cheesier. The way I make macaroni and cheese is the same way. I just make a bechamel sauce and add good cheese. With pastitsio, you would also have a meat layer, but you wouldn't have that with mac and cheese. Now both would also have pasta such as macaroni. Isn't that pastitsio or have I been misled? Now that I think about it, my friend from Athens called it something else that sounded something like macaroni -- makaronia?
 
1,389
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Joined Jul 24, 2001
:lol:

Risa! My question was not a rhetorical one!
I wondered what had to do with trends that's all

Pastitsio is a great dish but I think it is Italian

:)
 
818
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Joined Oct 13, 2001
Colored blue ketchup on mac and cheese , wow what a concept .
All I know is that mac and cheese is a simple dish with no stable recipe . Cook your macaroni al dente and mix with your most favorite cheese sauce ( home made ) place in a buttered 2 inch baking pan and top with seasoned and buttered bread crumbs .
Bake at 350 till bread crumbs brown and you have a great pasta dish that most everyone likes .
P.S. I love the gorgonzola effect also ..................
 
3,853
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Joined May 26, 2001
To get back to an earlier question: Who is the customer for these lists of trends -- the "average" consumer, or the culiary-industrial complex, or the high-end food professional (that is, all ChefTalkers!), or or or ...?

Whoever the lists are aimed at, it's not always such a terrible thing when "trendy" stuff gets interpreted by the chains and Con-Agra types, so that it trickles down (oops, sorry about the image!) to the supermarket or fast-food level. Think about it. A lot of people are eating a wider variety of foods than they used to 20 years ago. Why? Because somebody decided to try to make money on a strange, ethnic delicacy. And succeeded at popularizing it. I may not like Taco Bell (actually, I do :blush: ) or P.F. Chang's (no, sorry, can't stand them) -- but they have made some new foods readily available to the general public. Is their stuff "authentic?" Of course not! So what?! People who a few years ago never heard of tofu or shiitakes now eat them, and maybe, if we're all really lucky, sometimes buy them to use at home. (Well, that's a stretch, but you get the idea.) And that means that farmers have to grow different things, not just the same 5 crops over and over ... AND it means that maybe, just maybe, people are becoming a teeny-tiny bit less provincial. Of course, I too am generalizing, and placing too much hope on the power of food to open minds as well as mouths, but still ...

Gee, anybody want to join me on starting a chain of aushak restaurants?
 
7,375
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Joined Aug 11, 2000
As a member of St Louis Culinary Society, I've been privy to hearing local members that speak nationally on food trends. Many of the speakers are PR/Marketing people for large corps.
Yes there has been an insurgence of interesting foods (Thank you Frieda). BUT, the land that is growing altered crops and the pollen generated from them is blowing onto organic or non-GMO crops....Corporations are suing farmers for using saved seeds....it is a scary time for many of us, you can not bring back what is lost.
Mexican corn has been in the news the last few weeks, there has been an effort to keep pure strains of corn and they've found traces of GMOs in these plots.
It's the politics behind it. If there were not wind drift nor soil contamination or seed companies bought out, nor gov't subsidizing corporations that makes an unlevel playing field in the marketplace, then I would not be as adament.....but this shtuff is happening.
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
I will start with a bit of history, then a recipe:

It’s difficult to know exactly when the first batch of macaroni and cheese was cooked, but the dish’s history reaches back at least to the colonial era. Thomas Jefferson returned from a trip to Italy with a pasta machine, and served macaroni and cheese at dinner parties. Centuries later, in 1937, Kraft introduced a version that came packaged in the familiar blue boxes that are staples in pantries across the country. The following version of macaroni and cheese is one of my favorite comfort foods—rich, flavorful, and easy to make.

MACARONI AND CHEESE
Serves 12

8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, plus more for dish
6 slices good white bread, crusts removed, torn into 1/4- to 1/2-inch pieces
5 1/2 cups milk
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste
4 1/2 cups (about 18 ounces) grated sharp white cheddar cheese
2 cups (about 8 ounces) grated Gruyère or 1 1/4 cups (about 5 ounces) pecorino Romano cheese
1 pound elbow macaroni

1. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Butter a 3-quart casserole dish; set aside. Place the bread in a medium bowl. In a small saucepan over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons butter. Pour butter into bowl with bread, and toss. Set the bread crumbs aside.

2. In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, heat the milk. Melt remaining 6 tablespoons butter in a medium pot over medium heat. When butter bubbles, add flour. Cook, stirring, 1 minute.

3. While whisking, slowly pour in hot milk. Continue cooking, whisking constantly, until the mixture bubbles and becomes thick.

4. Remove the pan from the heat. Stir in salt, nutmeg, black pepper, cayenne pepper, 3 cups cheddar cheese, and 1 1/2 cups Gruyère or 1 cup pecorino Romano; set cheese sauce aside.

5. Fill a large saucepan with water; bring to a boil. Add macaroni; cook 2 to 3 minutes less than manufacturer’s directions, until the outside of pasta is cooked and the inside is underdone. (Different brands of macaroni cook at different rates; be sure to read the instructions.) Transfer the macaroni to a colander, rinse under cold running water, and drain well. Stir macaroni into the reserved cheese sauce.

6. Pour mixture into prepared dish. Sprinkle remaining 1 1/2 cups cheddar cheese and1/2 cup Gruyère or 1/4 cup pecorino Romano, and bread crumbs over top. Bake until browned on top, 45 to 60 minutes. Transfer dish to a wire rack to cool for 5 minutes. Serve garnished with sour cream if desired.



:lips:
 

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