10 inch versus 12 inch knives (and body size)

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by soesje, Feb 27, 2014.

  1. soesje

    soesje

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    I am wondering if anyone in here knows something about knife sizes and body size comparisons.

    I am 5 foot 8 inch.

    and what about 10 inch versus 12 inch knives. 

    one of the two more versatile? easy to move around? and in a pro kitchen.
     
  2. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    @Soesje  , myself, I'm 5'3" and I own a 12, 10 and an 8 inch chefs knife, all from the same manufacturer, same line (gifts from my loving hubby) , and I consistently grab the 8 inch

    ... for me it seems much more balanced in my tiny, as my husband calls them, little girl's hand

    But I'm not a Professional by any stretch, I only cook at home.
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I think there are factors in addition to height that matter.  I most often use an 8-inch, but also use 10 or 12 incjh blades.  For me (not too tall) the choice of chef knife length depends on (in priority order):

    1.  Size of cutting board (bigger board allows a bigger blade)

    2.  Size of item being cut (bigger item warrants a bigger blade)

    3.  Counter height (higher counter tends to warrant a shorter blade)

    4.  Weight of knife (lighter blade tends to warrant a longer blade)

    4.  Amount of stuff to be prepped (more stuff tends to warrant a linger blade)
     
  4. michaelga

    michaelga

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    As mentioned it's really more about what you are prepping than how big you are.

    If I hand you a box or two of celery and give you the choice of an 8" or 14" knife - i'm sure you'll quickly figure out what is going to be faster and less pain.

    Do several bags of potatoes, carrots, cabbage and other veggies a day and you'll be begging for minimum of a 12" knife no matter how tall you are.

    Same with meat - for example:

    I use a 12" tall blade to spit them and remove the back bone.  Safest way to do it - put backbone down on counter, insert knife into body cavity to one side of back bone.   Slide it forward and it locks into place as the tip clears the birds neck, put flat hand on top of tip and push heel down, repeat other side, flip and through the breast bone in one stroke.  

    Simple, safe and fast. 180 birds an hour no problems at all.
     
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  5. soesje

    soesje

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    ok I own a  8 inch wusthof classic ikon (hate it because of handle heavy), 9 inch kanso aogami (thin, sharp, light) and a 12 inch K-sabatier carbon.

    the first definitely is too short for working comfortably long times.

    so the points mentioned above gave some more things to think about.

    michaelGA, that was an interesting comment.

    especially the big quantity of veg and needing a bigger knife.

    why? I never tried that (use my 12 inch at home and my 9 inch at work mostly) . 

    is it less tiresome? 
     
  6. michaelga

    michaelga

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    I can top and tail 2 bunches of celery with two big cuts - same with about half a bunch of carrots etc.

    When doing cabbages or squash I can get the heel of the knife up and over the veg while still keeping the tip firmly planted on the prep table.  (you do want a lower table for this though, so you don't have to raise your arms way up high)

    My knives are all stamped blades though - they are too heavy if forged - just right if stamped with a very long blade.

    For me fewer cuts = less strain

    Also I bet the big 12" blade on my stamped knife is probably about the same weight as a forged 8 or 9" inch but better balanced.    I'll have to get the scale out when I get home.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2014
  7. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I never weighed my knives, but I think my 10 and 12-inch stamped carbon steel are substantially ligher than the forged 8 inch German chef knife.  I can't wait to hear the results of your scale!
     
  8. soesje

    soesje

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    I sit here grinning and am utterly curious….awaiting the weight of the stamped 12 inch knife...

    my 12 inch is a FORGED knife….. and it's heavy! K-Sabatier carbon...

    for fun will weigh it tomorrow. 
     
  9. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Whelp... glad I didn't have much bet on the line...

    12" TWIN Master Chef Knife -   225g

    8" Wusthof Classic Cook's Knife -   272g

    ~20% difference in weight.

    just for fun

    12" (CCC in Diamond) Carbon Steel Butchers Splitting Knife -   490g

    10" Richmond Artifex Chef - 190g

    10.6" Richmond Artifex Sujihiki - 160g
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2014
  10. soesje

    soesje

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    wow. 

    just weighed…. 450 grams… as heavy as your cleaver.

    never argue with girls with BIG knives LOL!!!
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2014
  11. benuser

    benuser

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    If balance is at least slightly forward weight is hardly a problem I would say.
     
  12. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Especially true if it's a longer knife because you can leave the tip on the board, which takes some of the weight off your wrist/arm.