The New American Cheese

Rating:
3/5,
Buy Now:
Amazon.com
Price:
$6.03
By:
Stewart, Tabori and Chang
  • Everybody loves cheese. Dripping from the tip of a hot slice of pizza, bubbling across a rich broth, or freshly grated over a bowl of creamy pasta, cheese flavors all of our favorite foods. American cheese no longer just means "manufactured"; at supermarkets and gourmet shops around the country, hand-crafted domestic cheeses have taken the place of factory-processed and imported brands. Cheese is the next great culinary revolution in this country. Ten years ago, only a handful of specialty cheesemakers could be found in America. Today there are more than 200. Connoisseurs are following the growth of the specialty American chees business with the same fervor they've applied to fine wines. The New American Cheese celebrates the cheesemaking renaissance, fueled by this explosion of interest. The New American Cheese takes an in-depth look at the art and craft of cheesemaking, and includes a history of cheese in this country. Author Laura Werlin profiles more than 50 of America's top cheesemakers and offers 80 inventive recipes showcasing the new cheeses available today. Nutritional facts; information on how to buy, store, and taste cheese; a directory of sources; and an extensive glossary make The New American Cheese an indispensible guide for amateur cheese lovers and experienced epicures alike.
  • Author:
    Laura Werlin
    Binding:
    Hardcover
    Dewey Decimal Number:
    641.3730973
    EAN:
    9781556709906
    ISBN:
    1556709900
    Label:
    Stewart, Tabori and Chang
    Languages:
    English
    List Price:
    $35.00
    Manufacturer:
    Stewart, Tabori and Chang
    Number Of Items:
    1
    Number Of Pages:
    280
    Product Group:
    Book
    Product Type Name:
    ABIS_BOOK
    Publication Date:
    2000-04-15
    Publisher:
    Stewart, Tabori and Chang
    Studio:
    Stewart, Tabori and Chang
    Title:
    The New American Cheese
    Creator:
    Steven Jenkins

Recent User Reviews

  1. joe george
    "The New American Cheese"
    3/5,
    The New American Cheese was written by Laura Werlin, a food journalist whose work has also appeared in Saveur, Self, and San Francisco. This is her first book, prior she worked in television news in San Francisco.


    Before reading or trying any of the recipes in the book the first thing that I noticed about it was its quality and physical beauty. Like the American cheese it promotes, this book is a piece of fine craftsmanship-It appears that there has been no expense spared in producing this book. It's loaded with beautiful glossy color photographs that were taken by Martin Jacobs a Manhattan based photographer whose work has also appeared in Spirit of the Harvest, A Taste of Hawaii and the Foods of Vietnam. What really surprised me at first was the weight of the book its an average sized book to look at, made of 280 pages, but it weighs as much as one twice its size-quality paper stock, I suppose. The look and feel of this book says "coffee table."

    Enough about how it looks, what's in the book is equally impressive. As opposed to some coffee table-style books, The New American Cheese is a practical book it can be decorative in any room, but it's also meant to be read, used as reference, and the recipes simply cry out to be made.

    Looking through The New American Cheese one can see straight away that the author clearly did her research. In the first portion of the book there are interesting and informative chapters focusing on the evolution of cheesemaking in America, how cheese is made, how to taste, buy and store cheese and how to pair cheese with wine, just to name a few. The second portion of the book focuses on recipes and profiles of specific American cheesemakers. I personally found the profiles of the cheesemakers absorbing it is interesting to read the histories of the dairies, and the biographies of the people who work them. It seems as though, like any craft, cheesemaking to these people is a labor of love.

    The recipes are organized in the standard transgression from appetizers to salads, main courses and desserts, with a sprinkling of pizzas, risotto, and vegetables. Of course, all of the recipes contain cheese in one form or another. The recipes are as interesting as the book is to read, here's a sampling: Three-Cheese Green and Red Lasagna, from Quillisascut Cheese Company Minted Fava Bean and Prosciutto Salad with Sheep's Milk Cheese, from Skunk Hollow Farm Slow-Roasted Salmon with Arugula, Tomato Jam and Cheese, from Vermont Shepherd and Quarky Chocolate Cake, from Cowgirl Creamery.

    The remainder of the book contains a glossary with definitive cheese-related terms and descriptions of cheeses. There's also an alphabetical list of cheesemakers around the country, and information on American cheesemaking-related associations. If you love cheese, and are the type of person that loves to read about all of the idiosyncrasies of a specific craft, this book is for you. The New American Cheese is a good read, has great, easy-to-follow recipes, and a beautifully executed book. If this is Ms. Werlin's first book, we can only look forward to what is to come.

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