Articles from pete

  1. Pastitsio-Greek "Lasagna"

    It’s time to dirty a few dishes. Okay, more than a few, but making pastitsio is worth the pile of pots and pans it requires to make it. If you are not familiar with pastitsio, it is a layered pasta dish, kind of similar to Italian Lasagna, most often associated with Greek cuisine although a similar dish can be found throughout the Mediterranean and Middle East. Often made with lamb, although beef is common also, the dish starts with a layer of pasta, then a layer of meat sauce, followed by...
  2. Bourbon Mustard Marinated Pork Chops

    I hate coming back to work after a fun holiday weekend. Work seems like such a let down after enjoying that time with family and friends but, unfortunately, this blog isn’t making me rich so for now I need to continue with my day job. One of the things I do enjoy about my job though is the drive to work. I have a 45 minute commute to work each day. Some people think that that is too long of a drive and it must bore me to death. It’s quite the opposite in fact. I love the drive. In the...
  3. How To Make Roux Making Sense Of Food Thickeners Part II

    Written By Chef Peter Martin
    In Part I of this series on food thickeners we looked at a variety of different items that can be used for thickening. In this part we will be focusing exclusively on flour, as a thickener, as that is what most people turn to when something needs thickening. As stated in Part I, flour is not the thickener of choice for everything. Fruit sauces, clear soups, certain meat glazes, and many pie fillings are just a few examples of items that do not do well being...
  4. Top Ten Cooking Myths

    Myths and misinformation abound in the cooking world. From old wives tales to supposed anecdotes, much of what we have been taught is just downright wrong. Many myths just lead to added steps and time to your food preparation, and in the long run, an inferior product.

    Although most of this information can be found all over the internet, it bears repeating as these myths just don’t seem to go away. Not only do I hear this misinformation repeated back to me time and again from novices and...
  5. Eggnog Pie

    Christmas is just around the corner,  It's my favorite holiday, and time, of the year. Not only is it Christmas, but my wife and I celebrate our anniversary right around that time (Dec. 30th) along with my parents and grandparents. So, as you can see the holiday is a very special time for me.

    I figured I would start the Christmas season off with a simple pie recipe. While it may be simple, it packs quite a punch in the flavor department. I tend to not drink a lot of eggnog. I’m not a big...
  6. When Things Go Wrong A Guide To Fixing Kitchen Disasters

    Written By Chef Peter Martin

    Let's face facts; we have all had our fair share of kitchen disasters, even us “professionals”, though we might not admit it.  From food being too salty, to scorched soups, to broken hollandaise, disasters do, and will, happen.  The good news is that many of these so-called “disasters” can be fixed relatively easily, with only a few that are beyond salvaging.  Below is a list of some of the most common kitchen disasters and how to fix them.

    Too Salty
    From...
  7. Forgotten Christmas Candy - Divinity and Angel Food Candy

    I love Christmastime!  I is one of my favorite times of the year.  I love the sights, the sounds, the smells, and just about everything that comes with the holiday....and yes....even the snow.  For me, it's not really Christmas if it isn't a White Christmas.  And, of course, I love the foods of Christmas!  You know the ones, those cookies and candies that only get made once a year, no matter how much you love them and crave them.  Those treats that just don't seem right when made in the...
  8. Making Sense Of Food Thickeners Part I

    How Do I Thicken My Soup?

    Slurry-finished by nicko posted Dec 29, 2018 at 9:42 AMWe rarely think when it comes to thickening soups and sauces. We usually just reach for that box of cornstarch are whip up a quick batch of roux, never really thinking of what we are doing. But do you really understand when to use one thickening agent over another? Why do most gravies use flour or a roux and why do many fruit desserts use cornstarch, arrowroot or tapioca?

    In part I of this series we will...
  9. Funnel Cakes

    This week was the Fond du Lac County Fair so on Saturday we headed over to see what the fair had to offer. Our fair may not be the biggest or the best county fair out there, but it does offer up a lot of fun, excitement, and for my 6-year-old daughter, a bit of an education as she got to watch a calf being born right before her eyes. The fair has all the staples; a midway full of rides and games of chance-you know the ones where you pay a couple of dollars for the chance to win a stuffed...
  10. A Brief Tour of American Barbecue

    Barbecue, barbeque, BBQ, or Bar-B-Que, no matter how you spell it America has developed an insatiable appetite for the stuff.  Restaurants specialize in it, competitions abound, and backyard grill jockeys brag about their deftness at creating perfectly tender, spicy, smoked meats.  But with all this hullaballoo, I would bet that, if you asked the average person to describe barbecue the first thing they would mention is baby back ribs slathered with a sweet and spicy tomato based sauce. ...
  11. Homemade Soft Pretzels

    One of the things I remember most about living in NYC were the pretzel carts that dotted the corners throughout Greenwich Village. Sure I remember the hot dog carts, but to be honest, I’m more of a fan of Chicago dogs than New York dogs (sorry NYC!). But I loved those pretzel carts, serving up hot, soft pretzels drizzled with American style, yellow mustard, none of that dijon or whole grain stuff!!! My mouth is watering just thinking about them. But my love of pretzels goes much farther back...
  12. Confessions of a Sell Out Chef

    Written By Chef Peter Martin
    This past fall I found myself unemployed.  With the economy the in the middle of its downward spiral, this was not a good thing.  And being a chef in Wisconsin my prospects were few. 

    While job hunting I got a call from a friend who had recently made the jump from the restaurant world into the world of institutional foodservice.  He claimed that he was enjoying his job and the lifestyle it afforded him, and better yet, he knew of a position open in his company...
  13. Spinach and Arugula Salad with Grapefruit

    It’s a typical March week here in Wisconsin. One day it’s up to 40°F (short sleeve shirt weather up here) and the next it’s cloudy, gray, foggy and snowy. But what do you expect, it’s Springtime in Wisconsin and that means the weather can change in a heartbeat. I’m just praying for more nice weather. I usually enjoy winter but it’s been a long, cold one and I’m ready for Spring, and not just the occasional teaser. I’m ready for some sustained nice weather.

    Late winter-early spring can be a...
  14. Making Sauerkraut

    Sauerkraut, it's one of those foods that you either love or hate, at least from my experience.  I've never met anyone that has a lukewarm opinion about it.  It's one of those foods that always seems to illicit a strong response.  I happen to fall into that category of those that love the stuff.  While I've always liked sauerkraut, at least as far back as I can remember, it wasn't until I learned to make my own that I came to truly love this German staple.

    Here, in Wisconsin, making...
  15. Romesco Sauce - Making Bell Peppers Shine

    Bell peppers are one of the unsung heroes of the vegetable world.  Quietly, they go about their business, adding flavor and texture to a whole host of dishes, but often we don't give them much thought.  Unlike their cousins, the chili peppers, who often take center stage, bell peppers often linger in the background, adding their qualities to the whole, yet often happy just to be part of the back up band, only occasionally rising to the front to star on their own.

    I find that strange...
Loading...