Articles from pete

  1. Gingered Bourbon Sour

    Like most of the people in the upper Midwest, I can’t believe the weather we are having. We’ve had almost a full week of 70-80° temperatures and it’s barely the middle of March. Of course, we’re all holding our breath, just waiting for winter to make one last bid for supremacy. We watch the news religiously expecting to hear that the season’s worst blizzard is heading our way and that this weather is nothing but a short tease before we are plunged back into sub zero temperatures.

    That...
  2. Summer Vegetable Pasta

    Here, in the US, we have a tendency to, usually, serve pastas with heavy tomato sauces or white, creamy cheese sauces, but some of the best pasta dishes are simply pasta tossed with a good amount of olive oil (or butter) and some fresh or sautéed vegetables, especially come summertime when those vegetables are at their peak of ripeness.

     I absolutely love the subtle anise (licorice) flavor of fennel and the fresh flavor it can bring to so many dishes. I will often shave it paper thin and...
  3. Chicken Rhubarb Stir Fry

    It’s been a tough spring so far, for gardening. We had a long, cold, wet spring and the summer has been very wet also. This year we had decided, in place of a CSA share we would rent a plot in the community garden and grow some of our own vegetables. Due to all the rain, we go the garden in late and since then haven’t been able to work on it very much. With storms rolling through the area, on average, every other day, the ground has not gotten dry enough to work, especially the clay based...
  4. Sopes con Carne

    Growing up in small town mid-America I wasn’t exposed to a whole lot of ethnic foods beyond the standard Americanized Italian, Chinese and Mexican. While I loved “Mexican” food, I really hadn’t realized that there was much more to the cuisine than tacos and burritos stuffed with either ground beef or chicken and served with a side of beans and rice. Sure, I encountered the occasional enchilada and even more rarely, the occasional tamale, but my experiences were rather limited. Once out of...
  5. Southwestern Chorizo Burger

    It’s hard to comprehend the shear mass appeal of burgers in the US. Fast food chains have created empires with burgers as their foundations, fine dining restaurants serve upscale “burgers” made of a variety of ingredients including Kobe beef, foie gras, and truffles. Some restaurants pride themselves on offering countless varieties of burgers, while other places vie for the title of “World’s Largest Burger.”

    Part of the reason for this mass appeal is the burger’s adaptability. The burger...
  6. Steak Tartare

    WARNING

    This post is all about the consumption of raw meat and eggs. If the above and below images make you queasy then stop reading.
    If you are a militant vegan or vegetarian you might want to stop reading.
    If you are grossed out by eating raw foods you might want to stop reading.
    If you work for the USDA you might want to stop reading or at least take note of the disclaimer below.
    If you are a lawyer you might want to stop reading or take note of the disclaimer below.

    DISCLAIMER

    As much...
  7. Individual Beef & Vegetable Pies

    I think everyone should keep a package or 2 of puff pastry in their freezer, ready to use at a moment's notice. I’m not talking about homemade puff pastry, but the stuff you can find in most grocery store freezers. Sure, the store bought stuff doesn’t compare with the rich, buttery flakiness of homemade, but let’s face it, making puff pastry is a time consuming process. Don’t get me wrong, I think everyone should try their hand at making puff pastry, but let’s face it, going out and buying...
  8. Jerk Chicken

    As I stated in my previous post, work has been keeping me pretty busy the last few weeks. Not only am I working 6 to 7 days a week, but I am also working 10-12 hours each day. That has left precious little time to do much serious cooking, though I have occasionally found the time. Where it really hurts is when it comes to grilling. My grills (1 gas, 1 charcoal and a smoker) have all remained more idle, for the past few weeks, than I like. Summer usually finds me grilling out at least a few...
  9. Featured

    How To Roast and Carve a Turkey

    You're finished with school, have moved out of your parents house and have your very first apartment.  You're feeling good about things and decide it's time to take that next great step to becoming a "real" adult.  You invite your parents over for Thanksgiving Dinner.  It sounded like such a great idea 3 weeks ago, but now, with Turkey Day fast approaching, the panic has set in.  "What were you thinking," you ask yourself.  "I can barely make a Grilled Cheese or heat up a can of soup without...
  10. Drinking History-Fruit Shrubs

    A couple of weeks ago I posted about how we went grape picking and the numerous jars of jelly my wife made with them. I also mentioned that we had plenty of leftover grapes for pie making and for me to experiment with. For awhile now, I have had a renewed interest in making shrub, a classic colonial American drink with a long history. With all the extra grapes, now was the perfect time to experiment.

    Shrubs can be categorized into alcoholic and non-alcoholic. The alcoholic versions are...
  11. How To Make Great Fried Chicken

    Written By Chef Peter Martin
    Fried chicken is nothing new.  Many cultures, around the world, have been cooking chickens by breading and frying them for centuries, but it is in the southern United States where frying chicken has been elevated to an art form.  It is believed that the Scots made this style, of cooking chicken, popular when they immigrated to the US and settled in the southern states.  It remained a staple of southern cuisine for many years but it wasn't until the latter part of...
  12. Bacon Waffles

    So, I’ve been left to fend for myself this weekend. My daughter headed down to Grandma’s to spend a little time with her and my wife went down to Chicago, picked up a friend, and headed over to Michigan to see an old friend. That leaves me, the dog, the cats and the fish. The goal was to get a bunch of yard work done, but the weather has not cooperated with those plans. I was able to get the much needed mowing done, between raindrops and even got some of the flowerbed weeded, but when I went...
  13. Beef & Guinness Stew

    I love stews and usually make them often during the cold, winter months, but I’ve been slacking in that department this year, it seems. There’s just something so comforting about a big pot of stew cooking away on the stove top when the wind is howling, the snow is blowing and the temperatures plummet. While I like all types of stews, I have to admit that I am partial to simple beef stews chock full of hunks of meat, carrots, onions, potatoes and other root vegetables.

    Like so many of the...
  14. Beet Sauerkraut

    But I’m back, and back with a new fermentation recipe. If you’ve been reading my recipes for awhile you’ll know that I love sauerkraut, pickles and all sorts of fermented foods, and thanks to Cheftalk, not long ago I received a fermentation crock, which I have been keeping full.  You can find my review for that crock at  Harsch Gairtopf Fermenting Crock Pot 10 Liter Me7420​ 

    With my most recent batch of sauerkraut I wanted to try something a little different. In my mind, I have always...
  15. Maple Syrup Springs Golden Elixir

    The world over, Spring is a magically time. A time of rebirth and renewal, a time for us to shake off the Winter blues and to look forward to the warm days ahead. For chefs and foodies it is an even more magical time. The first delicate vegetables of the season, such as peas, asparagus, fava beans, and spinach start to show in the local markets, and we get excited as thoughts of the local bounty that will soon be plentiful again. In the northern US, most of the spring crops don’t come to...
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